Many MCRNers present at AMS Spring Northeastern Sectional Meeting

The Northeastern section of the American Mathematical Society (AMS) held its Spring meeting at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, March 7-8, 2015. This meeting was well attended with more than 500 participants, including several members of the MCRN.

Chris Jones gave a talk on “A bimodality trap in model projections" (joint work with Naratip Santitissadeekorn) in a special session on Data Assimilation: Recent Progress in Theory, Methods and Applications; see www.ams.org/meetings/sectional/2225_program_ss23.html#title. Note that this work is about to be published in the CHAOS Focus Issue on Nonlinear Dynamics for Planet Earth (CHAOS, Vol. 25, March 2015). In the same session, Elaine Spiller presented "Some recent approaches for assimilating data from Lagrangian instruments."

Hans Engler and Hans Kaper had organized a special session on Conceptual Mathematical Models in Climate Science; see www.ams.org/meetings/sectional/2225_program_saturday.html#sthash.r72hLLys.dpuf. The speakers were Hans Kaper ("Introduction to conceptual mathematical climate models," joint work with Hans Engler), Jim Walsh ("New Budyko-type models of a slushball Earth," joint work with Christopher Rackauckas), Jonah Bloch-Johnson ("The temperature dependence of feedback and equilibrium climate sensitivity," joint work with Ray Pierrehumbert), Julie Leitfeld ("Smooth and nonsmooth bifurcation structures in an ocean convection model"), and undergraduate student John Kerin ("The Lorenz '96 model with spatial inhomogeneities," joint work with Hans Engler).

On Saturday afternoon, Simon Tavaré, a mathematician who is now the director of the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute & DAMTP at the University of Cambridge, UK, gave the Einstein Public Lecture in Mathematics. In his talk, "Cancer by the numbers," professor Tavaré demonstrated how the mathematical sciences have contributed significantly to our understanding of the way cancer evolves. Since cancer is a disease of the genome, the focus of this lecture was on mutations in DNA and what they tell us about tumor evolution. The lecture was followed by a reception.

 

 

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