MCRN participates in 2015 SIAM Conference on Dynamical Systems

May 17-21, Snowbird, Utah

There are too many MCRN-related presentations at the 2015 SIAM Conference on Dynamical Systems to list them all. Below are some, with MCRN members highlighted with links to https://mcrn.hubzero.org/.

The full conference schedule is at meetings.siam.org/program.cfm?CONFCODE=ds15.

 

Sunday, May 17

MS13 - Dynamics of High Dimensional Stochastic Models

9:00 AM - 11:00 AM,  Room: Primrose B

9:30-9:55 Tipping and Warning Signs for Patterns and Propagation Failure in SPDEs

Christian Kuehn, Vienna University of Technology, Austria; Karna V. Gowda, Northwestern University

MS3 - Ocean-in-the-loop: Towards Real-Time Monitoring in Geophysical Flows - Part I of II

9:00 AM - 11:00 AM,  Room: Ballroom 3

MS8 - Wave-turbulence Interactions in Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

9:00 AM - 11:00 AM,  Room: Maybird

Organizer: Ian Grooms (New York University) and Jared P. Whitehead (Brigham Young University)

MS17 - Featured Minisymposium: Stochastic Delayed Networks

2:00 PM - 4:00 PM,  Room: Primrose A

2:30-2:55 New Mechanisms for Patterns, Transitions, and Coherence Resonance for Systems with Delayed Feedback

Rachel Kuske and Chia Lee, University of British Columbia, Canada; Vivi Rottschafer, Leiden University, Netherlands

CP10 - Topics in Geometric and Nonlinear Dynamical Systems

4:30 PM - 6:30 PM,  Room: Superior B

Chair: Colin J. Grudzien (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

4:50-5:05 Geometric Phase in the Hopf Bundle and the Stability of Non-Linear Waves

Colin J. Grudzien and Christopher KRT Jones, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

CP12 - Topics in Atmospheric/Climate Dynamics and Related Themes

4:30 PM - 6:30 PM
Room: Primrose A

5:10-5:25 Modified Lorenz Equations for Rotating Convection

Jessica Layton, Jared P. Whitehead, and Shane McQuarrie, Brigham Young University

5:30-5:45 Empirical Validation of Conceptual Climate Models

Charles D. Camp, Ryan Smith, and Andrew Gallatin, California Polytechnic State University

SP1 - Juergen Moser Lecture - Dynamics and Data

8:15 PM - 9:00 PM,  Room: Ballroom

This lecture highlights interdisciplinary interactions of dynamical systems theory. Experimental data and computer simulation have inspired mathematical discoveries, while resulting theory has made successful predictions and created new scientific perspectives. Nonlinear dynamics has unified diverse fields of science and revealed deep mathematical phenomena.

Examples involving: One dimensional maps, Numerical bifurcation analysis, Multiple time scales, Bursting and MMOs in neuroscience and chemistry, and Locomotion are described, along with emerging areas having public impact.

John Guckenheimer (Cornell University)

 

Monday, May 18

MS19 - Patterns in Partial Differential Equations - Part II of II

8:30 AM - 10:30 AM,  Room: Ballroom 1

10:00-10:25 A Geometric Approach to Stationary Defect Solutions

Arjen Doelman, Leiden University, Netherlands; Peter van Heijster, Queensland University of Technology, Australia; Feng Xie, Leiden University, Netherlands

MS21 - Ocean-in-the-loop: Towards Real-Time Monitoring in Geophysical Flows - Part II of II

8:30 AM - 10:30 AM,  Room: Ballroom 3

8:30-8:55 Optimal Control in Lagrangian Data Assimilation

Damon Mcdougall, University of Texas at Austin ; Richard O. Moore, New Jersey Institute of Technology

9:00-9:25 A Hybrid Particle-Ensemble Kalman Filter for High Dimensional Lagrangian Data Assimilation

Elaine Spiller, Marquette University ; Laura Slivinski, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute ; Amit Apte, TIFR Centre, Bangalore, India

MS5 - Structural and Functional Network Dynamics and Inference

8:30 AM - 10:30 AM,  Room: Magpie B

9:30-9:55 Combined Effects of Connectivity and Inhibition in a Model of Breathing Rhythmogenesis

Kameron D. Harris, University of Washington ; Tatiana Dashevskiy, Seattle Children's Research Institute ; Eric Shea-Brown and Jan-Marino Ramirez, University of Washington

MS36 - Theory and Applications of Nonsmooth Dynamics in Physical Systems - Part I of II
1:15 PM - 3:15 PM,  Room: Magpie B

This minisymposium will provide a mix of talks featuring theoretical developments in nonsmooth systems as well as talks featuring applications with nonsmooth dynamics. In either case, physical applications provide the motivation for mathematical exploration. Additionally, the minisymposium will blend talks appropriate for a broad audiences and talks geared at experts. To that point, the minisymposium will begin with the very general "How nonsmooth are the Earth sciences?" which will set the stage for the rest of the speakers. Other talks will discuss issues such as generalized bifurcations, canard phenomena, synchronization, and the new area of resilience.

Organizer: Andrew Roberts (Cornell University) and Esther Widiasih (University of Hawaii, West Oahu)

1:15-1:40 How Nonsmooth Are the Earth Sciences?

Chris Budd and Tim J. Dodwell, University of Bath, United Kingdom

1:45-2:10 The Search for Glacial Cycles: A Quasiperiodically Forced Nonsmooth System in a Conceptual Climate Model

Esther Widiasih, University of Hawaii, West Oahu ; James Walsh, Oberlin College ; Richard McGehee and Jonathan Hahn, University of Minnesota

2:15-2:40 Analysis of an Arctic Sea Ice Model in a Nonsmooth Limit

Kaitlin Hill and Mary Silber, Northwestern University

View slides.

2:45-3:10 Mathematical Quantifications of Resilience

Alanna Hoyer-Leitzel, Bowdoin College

CP16 - Topics in Networks II

3:45 PM - 5:45 PM,  Room: Ballroom 3

4:25-4:40 Transient Spatiotemporal Chaos in a Network of Coupled Morris-Lecar Neurons

Renate A. Wackerbauer and Jacopo Lafranceschina, University of Alaska, Fairbanks

IP3 - Filtering Partially Observed Chaotic Deterministic Dynamical Systems

6:00 PM - 6:45 PM,  Room: Ballroom
Andrew Stuart, University of Warwick, United Kingdom

 

Tuesday, May 19

MS49 - Theory and Applications of Nonsmooth Dynamics in Physical Systems - Part II of II

8:30 AM - 10:30 AM,  Room: Magpie B

This minisymposium will provide a mix of talks featuring theoretical developments in nonsmooth systems as well as talks featuring applications with nonsmooth dynamics. In either case, physical applications provide the motivation for mathematical exploration. Additionally, the minisymposium will blend talks appropriate for a broad audiences and talks geared at experts. To that point, the minisymposium will begin with the very general "How nonsmooth are the Earth sciences?" which will set the stage for the rest of the speakers. Other talks will discuss issues such as generalized bifurcations, canard phenomena, synchronization, and the new area of resilience.

Organizer: Andrew Roberts (Cornell University) and Esther Widiasih (University of Hawaii, West Oahu)

8:30-8:55 Canard Phenomena in Nonsmooth Systems

Andrew Roberts, Cornell University

9:00-9:25 Generalized Hopf Bifurcation in a Nonsmooth Climate Model

Julie Leifeld, University of Minnesota

9:30-9:55 Dangerous Border Collision Bifurcation in Piecewise Smooth Maps 

Soumitro Banerjee and Arindam Saha, Indian Institute for Science Education and Research, Kolkata, India ; Viktor Avrutin, University of Stuttgart, Germany; Laura Gardini, University of Urbino, Italy

MS63 - Applications of Ensemble Data Assimilation Methods to Climate Processes

1:30 PM - 3:30 PM,  Room: Wasatch A

Data assimilation methods seek to improve estimates from a predictive model by combining them with observed data. Most realistic applications, such as those used in climate modeling, involve an underlying dynamical system which is nonlinear. Many ensemble methods have been designed to handle this nonlinearity, and additionally, often provide an estimate of the uncertainty in the prediction via the ensemble spread. This session will include applications of ensemble data assimilation methods to several aspects of the climate, including oceans, sea ice, and the ionosphere.

Organizer: Laura Slivinski (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute )

1:30-1:55 An Application of Lagrangian Data Assimilation to Katama Bay, Ma

Laura Slivinski, Larry Pratt, and Irina Rypina, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

2:00-2:25 Ensemble Inflation by Shadowing Techniques

Thomas Bellsky, University of Maine ; Lewis Mitchell, University of Adelaide, Australia

2:30-2:55 Ionospheric Weather Forecasting Using the Letkf Scheme

Juan Durazo, Arizona State University

3:00-3:25 Predicting Flow Reversals in a Cfd Simulated Thermosyphon Using Data Assimilation

Andrew Reagan, University of Vermont

MCRN HUB Tutorial

6:30-7:30pm, Alpine C

The “Hubministrators,” aka Colin Grudzien (UNC), Karna Gowda (Northwestern), Kate Meyer (Minnesota), Lewis Mitchell (Adelaide) and Monica Romeo (RENCI), have been working on setting up the MCRN HUB.  MCRN Co-director Hans Kaper, Karna and Colin lead the tutorial.  Sarah Iams (Northwestern), Ivan Sudakov  (Utah) and Yiping Ma (Colorado) assist.

Please bring your laptop, tablet or smart phone to set up an account and start utilizing the hub’s capabilities.  MCRN will have access to a dedicated wi-fi connection for member use on Tuesday evening.  MCRNers are welcomed to start gathering in Alpine C after the last Concurrent Sessions end (at 6:00).

View pictures taken by Hans Kaper.

PP1 - Poster Session and Dessert Reception

8:30 PM - 10:30 PM,  Room: Ballroom

Pattern Sequences as Early-warning Signs of Critical Transition in Models of Dryland Vegetation

Karna V. Gowda, Yuxin Chen, Sarah Iams, and Mary Silber, Northwestern University

View poster.

 

Wednesday, May 20

MS100 - Nonsmooth Dynamical Systems: Theory and Applications - Part II of II

1:30 PM - 3:30 PM, Room: Superior B

2:00-2:25 Some Nonsmooth Problems Inspired by Conceptual Climate Models 

Anna M. Barry, University of British Columbia, Canada

MS106 - Featured Minisymposium: Time-Delayed Feedback

4:00 PM - 6:00 PM,  Room: Wasatch B

4:30-4:55 Connection Between Extended Time-Delayed Feedback and Nonlinear Fixed-Point Problems

Jan Sieber, University of Exeter, United Kingdom

MS104 - Featured Minisymposium: Non-Autonomous Instabilities

4:00 PM - 6:00 PM,  Room: Ballroom 1

Organizer:Sebastian M. Wieczorek (University College Cork, Ireland)

4:00-4:25 Rate-Induced Bifurcations in Slow-Fast Systems

Sebastian M. Wieczorek, University College Cork, Ireland

4:30-4:55 Interactions Between Noise and Rate-Induced Tipping

Paul Ritchie, University of Exeter, United Kingdom

 

Thursday, May 21

MS113 - Statistical Physics and Nonlinear Dynamics for the Earth's Cryosphere

8:30 AM - 10:30 AM,  Room: Magpie A

Important elements of the Earth's Cryosphere such as sea ice, permafrost and snow were formed under temperature change resulting in nonlinear phase transitions. These critical phenomena in the Earth's Cryosphere remain of continuing interest as the climate system warms, and are crucial for the stability of the climate system. The melting processes in the Earth's Cryosphere can be investigated through classical statistical physics models as well the nonlinear behaviour of the climate system caused by phase transitions can be described with help of standard nonlinear dynamics tools.

Organizer: Ivan Sudakov (University of Utah)

8:30-8:55 Statistical Physics Models for Critical Phenomena in Permafrost Lakes

Ivan Sudakov, University of Utah

9:00-9:25 The Evolution of Complexity in Arctic Melt Ponds: a Statistical Physics Perspective

Yiping Ma, University of Colorado Boulder

9:30-9:55 How Climate Model Complexity Impacts the Stability of the Sea Ice Cover

Till Wagner, University of California, San Diego ; Ian Eisenman, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

10:00-10:25 Growth and Fluctuations of Suncups on Alpine Snowpacks: Comparison of Field Observations with a Nonlinear Pde Model

Tom Tiedje, University of Victoria, Canada; Kevin A. Mitchell, Simon Fraser University, Canada

MS123 - Spatio-temporal Patterns in Ecology

1:30 PM - 3:30 PM,  Room: Ballroom 1

Organizer: Vivi Rottschafer (Leiden University, Netherlands) and Arjen Doelman (Leiden University, Netherlands)

1:30-1:55 Patterns in Animal Communities and Phase Separation

Vivi Rottschafer, Leiden University, Netherlands

2:00-2:25 The Effect of Slow Spatial Processes in a Phytoplankton-Nutrient Model

Lotte Sewalt and Arjen Doelman, Leiden University, Netherlands; Antonios Zagaris, University of Twente, Netherlands

2:30-2:55 Stripe Pattern Selection by Advective RD Systems: Resilience of Banded Vegetation on Slopes

Eric Siero and Arjen Doelman, Leiden University, Netherlands; Jens Rademacher, University of Bremen, Germany

3:00-3:25 Pattern-formation in Semiarid Vegetation: Using Bifurcation Theory for Model Comparison

Sarah Iams, Northwestern University 

 

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