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US-China Collaboration travel grant

Funding for senior US mathematician to travel to Chinese host institution OR junior Chinese mathematician to travel to US host institution

The application will be available beginning September 15, 2015 on www.mathprograms.org.   Deadline: March 15 for travel that takes place the following academic year (between September and August.  Next deadline: March 15, 2016 (for the 2016-2017 academic year). Awards are usually announced in mid-late April of each year. -

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Study Math in Moscow Program grant

Scholarship for undergraduate or graduate mathematics or computer science majors to study in Moscow for a semester.  U.S. citizens or enrolled at a U.S. institution.

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For early-career travel in 2016-2017: AMS-Simons Travel Grants

For mathematicians who received their PhDs during 4/1/12 - 6/30/16.  Each grant provides an early-career mathematician with $2,000 per year for two years to be used for research-related travel.  Applicants must be located in the United States (or be U.S. citizens employed outside the U.S.)  See link for exceptions and requirements.

 

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Student travel grants for JMM 2016 and AMS Sectional Meeting

The application period for a partial travel grant to the JMM 2016 is August 21, 2015 through September 26, 2015.  This grant is only for final-year graduate students.

The travel grant for the sectional meetings are for any graduate student.  See link for details.

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SIAM student travel grants

Travel grants to attend SIAM conferences for students.  Must submit application seven months before the conference

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Class Assignments, Schedule, Syllabus, and Final

This class was developed to work in a "flipped classroom" format, in which there are few traditional lectures, and class time is spent for the most part with interactive learning activities and group work.  

A syllabus, schedule, the final project guidelines, and an example final project provided by my students are attached here.

The attached lists of assignments is included as a reference for some of the interactive learning activities used in this course.  These assignments follow some special formats described here:

  • Read and Share: These are assignments based around forming groups of students to read the assigned article, discuss questions in small groups, and then hold a wider group discussion at the end of the class period including all smaller groups.  Each group will focus on a specific component of the wider reading assignment, and students are to become experts in this component and share that perspective in the wider group discussion.
  • Read and Report: These are assignments based around forming groups of students like Read and Share, but with the small groups required to collaboratively develop a slideshow presentation on their reading to present to the whole class at the end of the period.  Students are encouraged to ask the presenters questions.
  • Discussion Readings: These are longer reading assignments assigned as homework, but class time can be spent in either Read and Share or Read and Report format when students can meet in their assigned groups to discuss their reading homework.
  • In Class Modeling Assignments: These assignments utilize the conceptual climate model C-ROADS, linked in this collection, and the resolved physics student climate model, EdGCM.  

I have also included some modifications to the Stabilization Wedges Game, included in this collection, in which I assigned stakeholder roles.  Students are meant to examine the Stabilization Wedges game from their stakeholder perspective and roleplay this group in the design of their solution.  Students are to discuss how their solution was shaped by their negotiation and their stakeholder interests.

The final assignment

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book: Local Food Environments: Food Access in America

Morland, 2014: 

  • "Describes impacts of local food environments on health
  • Reviews existing disparities within the US food delivery system
  • Highlights past and present government policies and practices (including local, state, and national food policies) demonstrating their influence on how food is delivered to individuals in the marketplace
  • Describes local food environments in relation to obesity and other diet-related diseases including diabetes and hypertension
  • Defines methods needed to study the effects of local food environments on human health"

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Article: Food environments and obesity— neighbourhood or nation?

Cummins and Macintyre, 2005:

"in this commentary we focus exclusively on environmental issues in energy intake in the developed world. Our aim is both to provide an overview of recent findings on obesogenic environments2 and to point to cross national variations in their distribution. "

 

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Curricular materials on food environment

 

From the JHU Center for a Livable Future.  Introductory level background info for a class.

"Lesson Summary

Students will examine how the environments in homes, schools, restaurants, stores and communities can affect what they eat. They will use tools such as maps and surveys to measure the cost, availability and accessibility of food in communities. Food maps of Baltimore City are included for in-class activities. Key concepts include food deserts and grocery gaps."

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Measures of the Food Environment

NIH-NCI website:

"This Web site provides a compilation of articles that include community-level measures of the food environment, as well as some of the instruments themselves. Here, we define the food environment to include food stores, restaurants, schools, and worksites. Measurement of the food environment and its effects on dietary behavior is a relatively new, but growing, field of inquiry. This Web site will be updated on a weekly basis."

It has about 600 articles in its "Measures of the Food Environment" database.

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Food Environment Canada report

"two complementary conceptual models"

1) "by Glanz and colleagues, (30)   ... Community nutrition environments ... are distinguished from consumer nutrition environments"

2) "by Lytle, (43) considers how individual, environmental, and social factors explain differences in eating behaviours."

see: 1) Glanz K, Sallis JF, Saelens BE, Frank LD. Healthy nutrition environments: concepts and measures. American Journal of Health Promotion. 2005;19(5):330–333. 

2) Lytle LA. Measuring the food environment: state of the science. American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2009;36(4S):S134–s144. 

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CDC food environment links

links to various white papers and journal articles about a healthy food environment.

"The food environment   is

  • The physical presence of food that affects a person’s diet,
  • A person’s proximity to food store locations,
  • The distribution of food stores, food service, and any physical entity by which food may be obtained, or
  • A connected system that allows access to food.

The food environment is also known as the community food environment, nutritional food environment, or local food environment. The retail food environment includes the community level (e.g., presence and locations of food stores, markets, or both) and the consumer level (e.g., healthful, affordable foods in stores, in markets, or in both)."

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USDA ERC food environment atlas

Maps: (many of these are data at the county level; a few are at the state level)

access to grocery stores

availability of stores by type

restaurant availability

food assistance (SNAP)

household food insecurity

food prices and taxes for selected beverages and snacks

local foods

health and physical activity

socioeconomic info

 

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Climate Interactive - World Energy Roleplay Exercise

The World Energy exercise enables people to try out and explore the policies and investment scenarios that will enable them to reach their goals on climate change. With a focus on the mix of solutions that will lead to a more stable climate this simulation can inspire hope that is grounded in our best understanding of the dynamics of the energy and climate system.

What policies would you choose to enable a future that:

  • stabilizes at 2 degrees C temperature rise?
  • supports economic health?
  • provides for equity?
  • minimizes environmental damages?
  • is viable if human civilization is at its best?

Participants are divided into teams that represent different sectors and negotiate with each other to come up with a global energy scenario that could lead to a safe and equitable clean energy future. Each team controls a handful of levers that are related to their sector and can be adjusted in the computer simulation En-ROADS. For example, the group focusing on energy supply has control over the levers that drive investment in renewable, gas, nuclear, and coal energy. Groups then present their plans and it is compiled and analyzed in real-time with En-ROADS.

This exercise has been piloted at Stanford, MIT, and other universities as we prepare to launch it at a much larger scale. The video below summarizes the Stanford event. You can also download some of the materials for World Energy and a learning assignment to accompany World Energy and En-ROADS.

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Climate Interactive - C-ROADS

C-ROADS is an award-winning computer simulation that helps people understand the long-term climate impacts of policy scenarios to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It allows for the rapid summation of national greenhouse gas reduction pledges in order to show the long-term impact on our climate.

Features

  • Translates climate mitigation scenarios into emissions, concentrations, temperature, and per-capita emissions outcomes
  • Offers ability to quickly run real-time policy analysis on a laptop or desktop computer
  • A graphical user interface that non-modelers can use to test “what if scenarios”
  • Ability to analyze up to 15 different nations or negotiating blocs simultaneously.
  • Backed by a scientific review committee of renowned climate and systems dynamics experts
  • Outputs are consistent with the larger, more disaggregated models used in the IPCC’s AR4
  • Model assumptions, inputs, and methodology are made transparent and in many cases can be easily adjusted to suit the user
  • Video tutorials are available online to guide use

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Climate Interactive - World Climate

World Climate enables participants to experience the dynamics that emerge as nations negotiate a global agreement on climate change and to develop a deeper understanding of how to address climate change. The exercise is framed by current climate change science, through the interactive C-ROADS computer simulation, enabling participants to find out how their decisions impact the global climate system in real-time.

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Center for Climate and Energy Solutions - Climate Change 101

To inform the climate change dialogue, the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions has produced a series of brief reports entitled Climate Change 101: Understanding and Responding to Global Climate Change, Updated January 2011.

These reports provide a reliable and understandable introduction to climate change. They cover climate science and impacts, climate adaptation, technological solutions, business solutions, international action, federal action, recent action in the U.S. states, and action taken by local governments. The overview serves as a summary and introduction to the series.

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MetEd - Coastal Climate Change

As climate changes, dynamic coastal regions are experiencing a wide range of impacts. Sea levels, ocean acidification, sea surface temperatures, ocean heat, and ocean circulation have all been changing in ways unseen for thousands of years. Arctic sea ice melted significantly more during summers in the last 30 years, and storms are intensifying. Coastal ecosystems stand to be damaged, and coasts will likely erode from rising sea levels, intensified storm surges, and flooding that climate change may amplify. Coastal communities will need to prepare adaptation strategies to cope, and many who live or work in coastal regions are wondering what climate change might mean for them. This module provides an overview of the impacts coastal regions are experiencing and may continue to experience as a result of Earth’s changing climate. A video series within the module demonstrates effective strategies for communicating climate science.

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MetEd - Weather and the Built Environment

This short course provides broadcast meteorologists, educators, and the public with an overview of the evolution of our modern urban environment with a focus on impacts on the urban watershed, air quality, and climate. This course complements the course Watersheds: Connecting Weather to the Environment and both are part of the Earth Gauge™ environmental curriculum for weathercasters and educators. This curriculum is being developed by the National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF). [Seehttp://www.earthgauge.net/wp/] Unit 1, Where We Live, takes a look at past and current U.S. growth patterns and the way our urban areas have evolved from compact population centers to automobile-dependent sprawl. Unit 2, Impacts on the Watershed, explores how the built environment affects the water that moves through an urban watershed. Unit 3, Impacts on the Atmosphere, highlights the way our urban landscape and industrial activities impact the air we breathe and the local climate. Each unit includes information on ways to reduce our impact on our water and air with ideas ranging from simple changes in our commuting and housekeeping habits to changes in how we build houses and roads.

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NOVA - Megastorm Aftermath

In October 2012, Megastorm Sandy cut a path of devastation across the Caribbean and the East Coast, killing hundreds and doing tens of billions of dollars in damage. To many, it was a wake-up call. Now, one year after Sandy's deadly strike, NOVA follows up on the 2012 film "Inside the Megastorm" with a fresh investigation of the critical questions raised by this historic storm: Was Megastorm Sandy a freak combination of weather systems? Or are hurricanes increasing in intensity due to a changing climate? What can we do to prepare ourselves for the next Sandy, and what progress has been made toward making our urban infrastructure more resilient? Much of Sandy's wrecking power was due to an extreme storm surge that left large swaths of New York and New Jersey underwater. And with sea levels on the rise, flooding will only become more frequent. NOVA examines the role of climate change in driving these rising seas, and looks at some of the latest extraordinary engineering employed in other areas, as well as what it may take to make cities like New York more resilient in the future.

 

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MetEd - The Amazon Rain Forest and Climate Change

This module discusses global climate change that is occurring largely because of greenhouse gases emitted by human activities, and in particular the impact that tropical deforestation plays in the climate system. It also covers signs of climate change, the current thinking on future changes, and international agreements that are attempting to minimize the effects of climate change. The United Nations Collaborative Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries (UN-REDD Programme) is also discussed.

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The Deforestation of the Amazon A Case Study in Understanding Ecosystems and Their Value

In this case study, students examine tropical deforestation in the Amazon from the perspective of three dominant stakeholders in the region: a peasant farmer, logger, and environmentalist. As part of the exercise, students perform a cost-benefit analysis of clearing a plot of tropical forest in the Amazon from the perspective of one of these stakeholder groups. Developed for a course in global change biology, this case could also be used in courses in general ecology, environmental science, environmental ethics, environmental policy, and environmental/ecological economics.

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